Spot FX Gets Walloped!

Spot FX Gets Walloped!

The BIS triennial survey, the most comprehensive data point, indicated that overall FX volume shrunk 5% from $5.36 Trln in 2013 to $5.09 in 2016. However, FX spot fell by a whopping 23.7%. London maintained overall geographic leadership but saw its share move down to 37% from 41% in 2013. APAC trading centers saw growth from 15% to 21% market share.  Overall, FX swaps and currency swaps grew, and cross currency swaps grew sharply, while FX option volume nosedived.

Spot fell across the major currency pairs Euro 12.5%, Yen 12.5%, Swiss Franc by 13.6% with Sterling rising by 2.6% as the lead up to Brexit caused considerable repositioning in Sterling assets.  No surprise as the Chinese Renminbi rose 41% and became the 8th most traded currency pair.

Capital constraints, digestion of regulatory change in the US and impending global regulation, changes in traditional liquidity provision, scandals and market disruptions since the last survey in 2013 are the main causes of the drop in spot. Additionally, the impact of the SNB’s surprise move in 2015 dislocated active FX trading and had many prime brokers reevaluating  their risk considerations. Creating challenges for smaller and riskier trading shops and hedge funds in maintain FX prime brokerage probably moved some of the FX spot volume onto exchange trade FX futures.


The market structure in FX continues to change quickly with acceleration in the adoption of digital models for trading and analyzing data in the FX market at the same time as major changes in FX market making and liquidity provision which has impacted spot FX trading.

 

 

A New Architecture for a New Age: Digital Transformation of IT Infrastructure in Investment Banking

A New Architecture for a New Age: Digital Transformation of IT Infrastructure in Investment Banking

Digital Transformation of IT Infrastructure

I recently wrote an article for CIOReview. A full copy of the article can be found here. In the article, I state that investment banks are transitioning their IT infrastructure to a new architecture based on a new vision: digital. The goal of digital transformation is clearly to simplify IT and operations, reduce cost, and thus improve ROE. Digital is driving demand for cloud-based infrastructure, BPO, and IT outsourcing with banks moving many applications to cloud.

But to create  A New Architecture for a New Age, the new architecture is about more than movement from analogue to digital. Emerging technologies like machine intelligence can not only drive efficiency, but also offer advanced analytics and insights leading to investing and trade ideas, superior compliance practices, improved customer engagement, additional revenue opportunities, and more.

Moving from Known to Unknown: Blockchange

To create this aggressive form of digital transformation, a new financial technology stack is coalescing around Internet of Things (IoT) and blockchain, powered by cloud. The blockchain design pattern allows for cryptographically secured environments upon which to conduct wholesale and investment banking functions.

We believe financial institutions will deploy blockchain networks with distributed ledgers in increasing numbers. Smart contracts, which are agreements whose execution is both automatable and enforceable (according to Barclay’s CTO Lee Braine) will be powered by the networks and backed by digital assets, legal templates, and standards. IT and open source organizations will provide the fabric for blockchain networks, including cloud, while a number of technology firms will deploy and manage these networks to support applications atop this fabric.

Smart contracts will be enabled by confidentiality, security, and digital identity. The underlying technology will incorporate cryptography, programmable digital assets, distributed ledger technology (DLT), and interledger protocols. Yes, getting to smart contracts requires a lot of organizational change. Fortunately, blockchain creates some first mover advantages. So it’s not just cost reduction, but actual revenue opportunities that will encourage change.

Moving Ahead

Slow to move incumbents will be uncomfortably exposed to an unforgiving environment. Some will seek partnerships with fintech firms, a kind of hedging against the future (not a bad strategy, but an incomplete one), only to become hamstrung by the next quarter's results.

A better strategy is to decide what the future industry architecture will look like and then work toward becoming a leader by offering a new model for the future. Getting to the new architecture will take a minimum of three years, but most likely closer to 4 or 5. ‘Run the bank’ still overshadows ‘change the bank’ massively. To get from a known architecture to an unknown one requires courage.

Human and Machine-Rise of the Cyborg: The Cycle of Voice Trading

Human and Machine-Rise of the Cyborg: The Cycle of Voice Trading

Celent has explored voice trading in Human & Machine-Rise of the Cyborg: The Cycle of Voice Trading, published yesterday. In this piece, we look at the power of voice trading as well as the business drivers, challenges and forces that are driving change in voice communication, collaboration and voice market engagement.

Celent believes that voice is a key channel that will remain relevant and will work more seamlessly with electronic and data channels in the coming years. A move toward unified communication approach and advances in technologies, combined with a challenging business environment, are reshaping the modern trading desk. Cost cutting, front office effectiveness, gleaning better insight into customer behaviour combined with digital automation are pushing this frontier forward. Voice trading remains the major channel for transferring risk, across asset classes, yet remains a challenge due to the difficulties in leveraging this unstructured data set.

Advances in both preparing and leveraging data for advanced analytics are creating a demand for business insights-the demand for better data is ever growing. Firms are beginning to leverage advanced data tools for not only risk mitigation and regulatory requirements, but are creating front office opportunities for better counterparty engagement and communication.

Fintech continues to advance in the capital markets and the implications are profound for incumbent players. Firms that effectively leverage the full spectrum of innovation available are becoming more streamlined and more effective. The overarching need for business model evolution and the importance of technology in the markets continues to ramp up. As one example,last week alternative dealer Citadel Securities hired Microsoft COO to be the new CEO of it electronic market making business.

We are surrounded by advances in voice technology for interacting with machines in our life in general. We are getting comfortable with Apple’s Siri on mobile, and Amazon's Echo in our homes. Similar technologies have advanced in areas outside the capital markets, but leading firms are trying to leverage voice data for better insight, engagement, and automation. While we are nowhere near Robotic Stingray Powered by Heart Cells from Rats published in last week’s WSJ, in merging machine and biological elements we are heading more into an era of the cyborg-where capital market participants will increase their direct engagement with machines via voice interaction.

The next wave of fintech disruption

The next wave of fintech disruption

The bank has traditionally sat in the center of the broader financial world.  The post-crisis challenges have allowed fintech firms to capture market share in traditional banking endeavours such as payments, lending, investments, and financial planning. First wave fintech disruptors with no asset base or legacy banking infrastructure have made significant inroads into challenging banks in their core businesses. Banks have reacted in a variety of ways to these challenges with disparate degrees of success, but only those actively partnering with and supporting fintech innovators have gained a competitive edge.

Similarly, exchanges have stood at the centre of the capital markets for much of human history. The years of connectivity, combined with the earth-shaking changes in the ability of firms to access capital and a global regulatory model that has focused on risk mitigation, have created an ideal world for next wave disruptors to bring solutions to complex trading, liquidity, regulatory, and operational problems that have been difficult for incumbent firms to solve on their own. This investment is going toward blockchain, RegTech, AI and other tools for driving change in the capital markets.

As it has happened with banks, those market infrastructure providers that decide to embrace, leverage and coexist with upcoming fintech firms will be able to further their historical strengths and stay at the core of financial markets.

Since 2008, capital flow into fintech investments has grown sixfold. Last year, about $19 billion in capital was invested in fintech across approximately 1,200 deals, nearly doubling funding flows in 2014. We have seen banks partnering with fintech, filling gaps and bringing critical experience and enterprise scale to these endeavours. Major parts of the financial services ecosystem run the risk of being transformed by pioneering financial technology firms. At the same time, strategic firms have developed innovation centers of excellence, laboratories, and their own CVC funding vehicles to invest and guide in areas of core interest to these firms. CVCs now represent 25% of global fintech capital flows.

This week the Deutsche Bourse announced the creation of its CVC DB1 to fund innovativation in the capital markets. Celent, on behalf of Deutsche Bourse, explores this next wave of fintech in the capital markets and highlights the power of future collaboration between leading financial infrastructure players and fintech firms.

Future of Fintech in the Capital Markets can be downloaded from the DB1 Ventures website. I look forward to your comments.

The battle for the soul of exchange-based equity trading?

The battle for the soul of exchange-based equity trading?

The recent statements by Nasdaq regarding the possible use of a trading delay by the proposed IEX Exchange puts the spotlight on a battle for supremacy not just between rival exchanges, but very different philosophies regarding what the ultimate role of exchanges in the global capital markets should be. The established exchanges, willingly or unwillingly, represent the status quo in terms of how exchanges should function. IEX on the other hand hopes to represent the interests of those trading participants who believe that they have been left behind in the race for speed in today's capital markets, especially the retail participants and the smaller buyside. It seems like an inevitable outcome in the aftermath of the global financial crisis, which has stoked the debate on economic inequality and the unfair advantage that a select group of trading participants have over others due to their advanced technological capabilities and use of highly sophisticated financial products. 
Getting back to the objections raised by Nasdaq over the SEC proposal that any delay of less than a millisecond could qualify as immediate, which would enable IEX to operate in the way it wants, there is certainly some substance in Nasdaq's argument. The SEC would have to come up with a solution that is acceptable to both sides, and does not leave it vulnerable to legal challenges. It is going to be an interesting couple of months for industry obervers as they follow the debate over the fairness and validity of the SEC proposal, and the decision on the IEX application.

Proof of artificial intelligence exponentiality

Proof of artificial intelligence exponentiality

I have been studying Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Capital Markets for ten months now and I am shocked everyday by the speed of evolution of this technology. When I started researching this last year I was looking for the Holy Grail trading tools and could not find them, hence I settled for other parts of the trade lifecycle where AI solutions already existed.

Yesterday, as I was preparing for a speech on AI at a conference, one of my colleagues in Tokyo forwarded me an Asian newswire mentioning that Nomura securities, after two years of research, would be launching an AI enabled HFT equity tool for its brokerage institutional clients in May –  here it is: the Holy Grail exists, and not only at Nomura. Other brokers have been shyly speaking about their customizable smart brokerage, e.g. how to use technology so that tier5 clients feel they are being served like a tier1. Some IBs are working on that, they just don’t publicly talk about it.

Talking to Eurekahedge last week I realized that they are tracking 15 funds that use AI in their strategy, I would argue there are even more than that because none of those were based in Japan (or Korea where apparently Fintech is exploding as we speak).

All this to reiterate that AI is an exponential technology, ten months ago there were no HFT trading solutions using AI, and we thought they were a few years away but no, here they are NOW. And the same with sentiment analysis, ten months ago they were just a marketing tool, now they are working on millions of documents every day at GSAM. Did I forget to mention smart TCA that’s coming to an EMS near you soon?

Stay tuned for more in my upcoming buy side AI tools report.

Being smart with artificial intelligence in capital markets

Being smart with artificial intelligence in capital markets

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the new buzzword to talk about on the street. Financial institutions need to embrace AI, as we have explained in our January report, or else they risk to lose competitiveness or be coded by the regulators more than they can do it themselves.

I am in NYC next week to share Celent’s view on AI for capital markets. A little preview for your here.

Today we are at a crossroad where data scientists have the computing power, the alternative mind-sets to search and the willingness to look for narrow AI solutions, not the wide AI brain that we should get to in 2030 according to experts. This enables vendors to come up with amazing solutions from Research Scaling with Natural Language Generation to Market Surveillance/Insider Trading with Machine Learning Natural Language Processing or even Virtual Traders via Deep Learning of technical analysis graphics traders look at to take decisions.

The amount of data available is another big driver for the rebirth of AI, and regulators are looking at ways of accessing that data and using it. This is borderline what my colleagues would call RegTech, and it’s coming.

Our Q2 agenda reflects our understanding that you want to know more about AI: we will share ideas on solutions for the buy side, for exchanges and for the sell side. But in the meantime I hope to bring back some cool ideas from the big apple, hopefully also from the secretive quants working in the dark Silicon Alleys.

Most of the vendors I have profiled are specialists’ boutiques, but the cost of such research is however so enormous that generalists are trying to productize their fundamental research for various sectors, from health to homeland security, including financial services in partnership with financial institutions.

This morning I woke up to great news that Microsoft is at the forefront of Deep Learning on voice, imagine what this could bring to Anti-Money Laundering or Insider Trading products.  The other news was that some top quants of Two Sigma just solved an MRI algo to predict heart disease, and I hope other great minds will, as most of them usually do, also give back to society by applying their amazing knowledge to such grand challenges.

Intra-inter dealer broker deal: facing the future

Intra-inter dealer broker deal: facing the future
Speculation reached the point Friday afternoon such that a press release came out regarding the discussions of two major brokers. ICAP and Tullett Prebon, two of the largest inter dealer brokers (IDBs) announced that they were in advanced discussions; it appears ICAP is poised to sell its voice brokering businesses and certain electronic platforms to Tullett. On first blush, it looks as though ICAP will be shedding its voice brokering businesses and certain e-platforms; while maintaining such platforms as EBS and Broker Tec (FX and Treasuries) as well as other platform assets, ancillary businesses around these platforms (such as data and analytics), as well as ICAP’s extensive post-trade infrastructure. Friday’s press release detailed the assets that would be part of the transaction. In summary: • ICAP’s three regionally managed voice broking businesses in EMEA, the Americas and Asia Pacific (1,458 voice brokers); • (“APAC”), including all e-trading products and services developed by ICAP’s e-Commerce team (including Fusion and Scrapbook) (together “Global Broking”); • ICAP’s 40.23% economic interest in iSwap, a global electronic trading platform for EUR, USD, GBP and AUD IRS; • Revenues and operating profits from sales of information services products directly attributable to Global Brokering and iSwap; and, • Certain JVs and investments. IDBs have struggled in the post-crisis world to deal with the changing dynamics of regulation, the nature of their place in the market and lower volumes. Furthermore, MiFID II is on the horizon in Europe and will further change the competitive nature of the IDB space. More importantly, in many cases, IDBs have struggled for years with the right formula to develop electronic distribution and sales channels without cannibalizing their core voice businesses. The pressure on the IDB community has been immense. ICAP now has an opportunity to focus on an electronic future, across assets, from font to back office.  ICAP, with holdings across markets will now be a considerably leaner technology company. It will be able to serve its traditional dealer clients as well as other businesses in the changing capital market world. It is very likely in the next day, with the confirmation of a deal, ICAP will be beginning a path toward being a very different, technology and processing based company. As a final note, it will be interesting to see if there are any other competitors, on the side-lines, who will be positioned to step-in and change the final parameters, or even players in the deal (as was the case with BGC/Cantor in the GFI Group deal).

The future is here

The future is here
The pressures are well known in banking and the capital markets. Each month there are front page articles of scaling back, overhauling, reorganizing, or closing major bank lines. A continued reworking, a forging of a new business is occurring. Old models are shrinking and being replaced by new business models or being cast aside. Since the 2008 crisis, wave after wave of pressure has made this perfectly clear. Capital constraints, on-going regulatory pressures, and an ultra-low interest rate environment have all struck hard at the existing banking & broker/dealer system. Nearly all players-big and small- are rethinking the very core of their businesses. And this is a multi-threaded problem across all businesses: equities, FX, fixed income, and derivatives. Banks and broker/dealers are trying to balance their existing franchises against the pressures they are facing to create a lean profitable business that supports their clients. There are no easy answers, given the strong interdependence between the wealth, asset management, and capital markets businesses across all products. Many of the solutions are moving from efficiency, or cost-cutting to effectiveness. Costs are being cut-there are improvements in risk, compliance, processing. The cost side is getting better but the challenge remains on the revenue side. This drive for effectiveness is driving business models that support internal and external clients from a compliance, transparency, regulatory, fairness and cost perspective are driving more automation and electronic trading solutions. Celent will be discussing the evolving landscape of innovation in automation and technology at two upcoming roundtables. On September 15th in London we will be looking at changes in the US and European fixed income markets and how new technologies are driving change. Then on September 22nd in Zurich, we will be looking at wealth management and the capital markets and the many changes that are occurring in Swiss banking.

Billions, trillions-actually it’s quadrillions

Billions, trillions-actually it’s quadrillions
I am going to start today’s blog post with a short quote from Blythe Masters who was presenting last week at a conference on digital currencies, where she was reported as saying, “It should be fairly obvious that the addressable market for this technology is absolutely gigantic. We’re talking markets that are measured in the trillions, not the billions.” Actually, the dollar value of securities transactions processed each year is measured in the quadrillions. That is the first time I have used the word “quadrillion” in writing but I think I will be using it a lot more in the coming months. The market sizes for possible disruption in capital markets by distributed ledgers/ blockchain technology are absolutely staggering as is the breadth of impact on lowering costs, freeing up capital, reducing counterparty risk, introducing new financial services players, and managing the systemic risk of our financial system. As mentioned in an earlier blog post, we are starting to see different approaches to distributed ledger/ blockchain technology emerge and, frankly, there remain a number of challenges to implementing the right architecture for this technology. However, when you are talking about markets measured in the quadrillions then the financial incentive to innovate and navigate these challenges is arguably larger than any financial incentive in history. Incumbent financial institutions have got to be on the front foot when it comes to understanding the potential impact on themselves and the ecosystem they’re a part of.