Celent’s Innovation and Insight Day: Wealth and Asset Management Stream

Celent’s Innovation and Insight Day: Wealth and Asset Management Stream

We are only weeks away from Celent's 2017 Innovation and Insight Day where we will explore how players in the financial services market are leveraging technology in innovative ways in order to differentiate themselves in an increasingly competitive and challenging marketplace. We will be featuring a number of case studies, discussions, and deep-dives into topic areas surrounding innovation and focusing on themes, such as:

  • Customer Experience
  • Products
  • Emerging Innovation
  • Operation and Risk
  • Legacy Transformation

This is the first year we will have a Wealth and Asset Management (WAM) breakout session where we will cover a range of topics around innovative solutions and trends in WAM.  The agenda can be found here: Wealth and Asset Management (WAM) Program and will be presented by analysts from the Celent Securities & Investments and Wealth & Asset Management teams:

  • David Easthope, Senior Vice President, Securities & Investments
  • Brad Bailey, Research Director, Securities & Investments
  • Kelley Byrnes, Analyst, Wealth & Asset Management
  • John Dwyer, Senior Analyst, Securities & Investments
  • Ashley Globerman, Analyst, Wealth & Asset Management
  • Arin Ray, Analyst, Securities & Investments
  • William Trout, Senior Analyst, Wealth Management
  • James Wolstenholme, Senior Analyst, Wealth & Asset Management

I particularly look forward to sharing research around the evolving wealth management landscape as the core client base shifts from baby boomers to millennials. While much ground has been covered from the perspective of wealth managers to meet the digital needs of nextgen clients, wealth managers continue to be behind the curve in their digital offerings.

How are wealth managers and vendors responding to the paradigm shift in the development and execution of services and products to meet millennials’ distinct expectations?

This is just one example of the many topics that we will discuss at I&I day – we hope to see you there!

 

FinTechStage Luxembourg

FinTechStage Luxembourg

This week I attended the conference, FinTechStage Luxembourg, which brings together FinTech start-ups, investors, financial institutions, technology partners, and regulators to discuss the evolving financial market ecosystem. Some of the key takeaways from the day-long discussion among industry experts included:

  • Luxembourg is aiming to attract UK FinTechs post-Brexit by becoming a hub to access the EU
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Digital identities
  • Banking the underbanked in developed countries
  • RegTech
  • Data protection

For the purpose of this blog post, I will focus on the RegTech component of the conference as that subject stood out to me as one of the more thought-provoking topics as the financial services industry transitions into a technology industry and the effect this has on the entire value chain across all industry players. Lázaro Campos, co-founder of FinTechStage, introduced RegTech (and RiskTech) as "recent risk-centric regulations require firms to be more coordinated and streamlined in terms of information production and delivery for trading, risk, compliance, and financial reporting".  One of the major points within this theme was that the application of new technologies will aid in making processes more efficient, and importantly, democratise opportunities by opening the market to previously unprofitable and underbanked client segments. 

While "incumbents and technology vendors have invested in regulatory solutions for years, the theme of RegTech is an interesting investment theme that has emerged over the past year and has since become mainstream" (Matteo Rizzi, co-founder of FinTechStage). It was made clear that regulators are as encumbered with the increase in regulations as are financial market players. 

Nadia Manzari, Head of Innovation, Payments, Markets Infrastructure and Governance for the Commission de Surveillance du Secteur Financier, commented that regulators need to be innovative in order to foster a healthy FinTech ecosystem. The subject of FinTech sandboxes was at the heart of much of the discussion – does each regulator need to offer such an environment? Regulators from the UK, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Indonesia, Australia, and Thailand have been coming forth with plans to establish FinTech sandboxes, which enable financial institutions and start-ups to experiment with financial technology solutions that may not yet comply with new regulations. The benefits of sandboxes (versus piloting, for example) emerged as a debatable topic, but it is evident that regulators' evolving perspective on FinTech is indicative of a larger theme that is occurring in the regulatory space: the centralised banking system with which we are familiar will change in the near future.

Technology, Training & Compliance in Light of the Fiduciary Standard

Technology, Training & Compliance in Light of the Fiduciary Standard
Capturing retirement assets is paramount for brokerages. When thinking about the word saving, it is hard not to think about retirement.  Brokerages are constantly looking for rollover assets, and as baby boomers retire, this search has never been more significant — which is why, when the DoL Fiduciary Rule was proposed, brokerages quickly reacted.

  April 10, 2017, when Phase 1 of the DoL Fiduciary Rule goes into effect, is quickly approaching.

  My latest report, The Quest for Retirement Assets: When the Light Shines on the Fiduciary Standard, explores ways that brokerages are reacting to the DoL rule. Brokerages continue to rethink their operating model. Brokerages are questioning their existing technology: Can it support a new business model? How should training be embedded and amended to support compliance with the DoL Rule? In my report I lay out some of the challenges facing brokerages, as well as best practices for compliance and training.   Regardless of whether the DoL rule is delayed, changed, or repealed, advisors need to know how to clearly communicate their offering to clients as it relates to the fiduciary standard. Investors are more aware than ever of the fiduciary standard. Even if the DoL relaxes its stance, there is no doubt that investors will continue to pressure advisors to act as fiduciaries. It won’t be long before clients ask for proof that portfolio transactions and ideas are made in their best interest.  

Roll over, don’t play dead

Roll over, don’t play dead
In my most recent report, Wings of a Butterfly: Regulation, Rollovers and a Wave of Optimization Software, I discuss the challenges the DoL conflict of interest rule poses to the $7 trillion IRA rollover business. These challenges center on the need for advisors to break down 401k plan costs and make apples-to-apples comparisons of proposed rollover solutions.   Why focus on the rollover? First, the rollover decision serves as a touchstone in the relationship between client and advisor. Trust sits at the center of recommendation to roll over, and seldom are the vulnerabilities of the client so exposed. The importance of the  rollover decision is further magnified by timing. It often takes place at the apex of client wealth, where the consequences of missteps for the investor can be severe. For the advisor, the rollover offers a unique opportunity to capture assets, or at least advise on their disposition, as well as present a coherent strategy for drawdown.   The implications of the decision to roll over extend beyond the client advisor relationship to firm strategy, of course. They are particularly relevant to product development and distribution. I’ll discuss these implications in a later post.

New Year New Tech New Research

New Year New Tech New Research
In your new year resolutions, did you pledge to understand more the technology that scares you? Or at least the one that some people (aka analysts like me) claim will replace you? If the answer is “No” and you are working in the field of Investment Research, whether producing, consuming or distributing it, then you may want to read our latest report Start Coding Investment Research: How to Implement MiFID II with Robots and AI.

I get paid to write research on fintech so theoretically I am not the tech scared type though I am the first one to control screen time at home. I know we have more and more competition from free research you can all find at your fingertips on the internet, and from cheaper research that leverages outsourced resources crunching a lot of data, but so far we are keeping up probably because our clients think we provide insight that those competitors do not provide yet.

I know however that we have competitors that have technological platforms that distribute their technology in a more user-friendly way with podcasts and fancy databases, that write their research in a more automated way and that you can consume easily because you pull the information with selective search technology that knows what you want and how much you can pay for it.

So before the holiday season, to make sure we were all going to start this new year with the right information in hand, I did look into what artificial intelligence and robotic process automation tools will be doing to research; not exactly my kind of markets fintech research, but more specifically to Investment Research, those written recommendations about equity or bonds or macroeconomic environments to help the buy side make investments.

The result is very honestly scary and exciting at the same time. These new  technologies are maturing at a time of big regulatory change in Europe, MiFID2 is finally kicking in and that means the unbundling of investment research cost from the execution costs the brokers and banks charge their buy side clients. Some buy side will keep using them and be happy to pay that fee, some clearly will start looking at other solutions that will have to propose a different business model provided by banks or by new market players, based on technology.

In our recent report we do look exactly at that: new business models and live case studies that have already been implemented in investment research production, distribution and consumption. Enjoy.

Wells Fargo rides herd on DoL

Wells Fargo rides herd on DoL

It’s no coincidence that Merrill Lynch launched its new robo platform the same week it decided to exclude commission based product from IRAs. Likewise, the decision by Wells Fargo to announce a robo partnership with SigFig suggests that despite the pronouncements of pundits and industry lobbyists, DOL is hardly DOA.

It takes a brave man to guess how the Trump administration will balance populist tendencies with free market rhetoric. In this case, as I note in a previous post, the inauguration of the new president precedes DoL implementation by less than three months. The regulatory ship has left port, and in any event, it's not clear that President Trump will want to spend valuable political capital undoing DoL.

I’ll discuss Wells Fargo’s motivations in a later post. For now, I’ll note the degree to which a robo offer aligns well with the principles of transparency, low cost and accessibility at the heart of DoL. At the same time, I caution the reader to consider the challenges that any bank faces in rolling out a robo platform, a few of which I underscore in this column by Financial Planning’s Suleman Din.

DOL or DOA? The Election and the Conflict of Interest Rule

DOL or DOA?  The Election and the Conflict of Interest Rule

It’s one of those watershed moments. Clinton wins, and the Department of Labor (DoL) conflict of interest rule takes hold and likely gets extended beyond retirement products to all types of investments. Trump wins, and DoL gets slowed down and perhaps even rolled back.

Assuming Clinton wins (which appears likely) firms will need to gear up on three fronts:

  • Platform: DoL makes paramount the ability to deliver consistent advice across digital and face to face channels. Such consistency requires a clear view of client assets held in house, which in turn implies eliminating legacy product stacks and their underlying technology silos, as I note in a recent report.
  • Product: Offering only proprietary products only is a non-starter under DoL. But too much product choice can be as bad as too little. Firms must demonstrate why programs and portfolios offered are the best for each particular client.
  • Proposition: In a best interest world, the client proposition must extend beyond price. Client education, transparent performance reporting and fee structures, as well as an easy to use digital experience, will distinguish stand outs from the broadly compliant pack.

None of the pain points above lend themselves to easy solutions. As such, the banks and brokerages most affected by DoL are struggling to develop processes that go beyond exemption compliance. I’ll discuss more comprehensive approaches in the All Hands on Deck: Technology's Role in the Scramble to Comply with the DOL Fiduciary Rule  webinar I’m co-hosting this November 14.

I hope you will join me for the webinar, and in the meantime, you will share your thoughts and comments on this post.

Human and Machine-Rise of the Cyborg: The Cycle of Voice Trading

Human and Machine-Rise of the Cyborg: The Cycle of Voice Trading

Celent has explored voice trading in Human & Machine-Rise of the Cyborg: The Cycle of Voice Trading, published yesterday. In this piece, we look at the power of voice trading as well as the business drivers, challenges and forces that are driving change in voice communication, collaboration and voice market engagement.

Celent believes that voice is a key channel that will remain relevant and will work more seamlessly with electronic and data channels in the coming years. A move toward unified communication approach and advances in technologies, combined with a challenging business environment, are reshaping the modern trading desk. Cost cutting, front office effectiveness, gleaning better insight into customer behaviour combined with digital automation are pushing this frontier forward. Voice trading remains the major channel for transferring risk, across asset classes, yet remains a challenge due to the difficulties in leveraging this unstructured data set.

Advances in both preparing and leveraging data for advanced analytics are creating a demand for business insights-the demand for better data is ever growing. Firms are beginning to leverage advanced data tools for not only risk mitigation and regulatory requirements, but are creating front office opportunities for better counterparty engagement and communication.

Fintech continues to advance in the capital markets and the implications are profound for incumbent players. Firms that effectively leverage the full spectrum of innovation available are becoming more streamlined and more effective. The overarching need for business model evolution and the importance of technology in the markets continues to ramp up. As one example,last week alternative dealer Citadel Securities hired Microsoft COO to be the new CEO of it electronic market making business.

We are surrounded by advances in voice technology for interacting with machines in our life in general. We are getting comfortable with Apple’s Siri on mobile, and Amazon's Echo in our homes. Similar technologies have advanced in areas outside the capital markets, but leading firms are trying to leverage voice data for better insight, engagement, and automation. While we are nowhere near Robotic Stingray Powered by Heart Cells from Rats published in last week’s WSJ, in merging machine and biological elements we are heading more into an era of the cyborg-where capital market participants will increase their direct engagement with machines via voice interaction.

Post-Brexit questions loom over Europe

Post-Brexit questions loom over Europe

The post-Brexit environment is still quite hazy, but the politicians and regulators in the EU are trying to lay markers for future discussions and negotiations. There have been several comments that betray a fear of further demands for exits from  the EU by the politicians and citizens of other countries that have high levels of Euro-scepticism, such as the Netherlands, France and Greece. 
The French president recently stated that clearing for Euro-denominated securities would no longer happen in London and this "could serve as a lesson" to those who are questioning the need for the EU. Strong words indeed for a market that currently gets jittery at the drop of a hat. In a similar move, the president of the German financial regulator, BaFin, has  also expressed doubts on the possibility of the LSE-DB merger if the resultant entity is based in London. The exchanges themselves have mentioned their intention to go on inspite of the added complexity due to Brexit, but I am sure they are keeping an eye on the political headwinds that are developing around them.
On their part, the British politicians and regulators are trying to calm the markets down and lull them into believing that little has changed in the aftermath of Brexit. The desire to delay invoking Article 50 to officially confirm UK's demand for exit is an example of this strategy, although EU leaders are opposed to this move. The claim by the politicans who supported Leave that there would not be any major and immediate economic or financial change after the referendum is another attempt of this nature.
While both these parties would probably be interested in discussing the issues that have arisen behind closed doors, in public they have to make the right noises to ensure damage control. There is also anger and resentment in the EU at the UK's decision and this shows from time to time in some of the comments. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has a very balanced attitude to Brexit, but she has also conceded that the UK cannot enjoy access to the EU single market the same way as it did earlier, something that was suggested by Boris Johnson. There is a genuine concern in the EU to prevent cherry-picking in this regard. 
The various questions that have arisen post-Brexit will take a while to be answered. But what is clear is that there is going to be a significant parting of ways and the separation is going to be less than amicable, at least in public. For capital market professionals, in this landscape the discussion ends up being about political rather than economic or financial issues, in spite of trying otherwise. The latter have to take a backseat at time like this and this might continue for the weeks and months to come.

To Brexit and beyond!

To Brexit and beyond!

So the Brexit has finally happened. The equity, forex and bond markets are still reeling from the news, the volatility probably caused as much by the fact that Brexit was unexpected as of yesterday night in the UK as by the event itself.
While the overall impact will reveal itself over the next several years, in the next few months the capital markets would have to deal with issues such as the future of the LSE-DB merger. Does it make sense anymore, and if yes, how do the two parties proceed? One would expect that now there would be political pressure to ensure that trading and jobs do not move away from either London or Frankfurt. Keeping all stakeholders happy would be a more complicated affair, although it could still be done.
EU wide market infrastructure regulations such as T2S and MiFID II would also now be seen in a new light. London was seen as the financial capital of Europe. The EU would now have to proceed with these significant changes at a time when the UK is preparing to exit, and is weighing its options in terms of how best to deal with the rest of Europe. It could take a middle ground as Switzerland has taken, or position itself even further away with more legal and policy independence but less overlap with the European capital markets.
In an earlier blog that considered the possibility of Brexit, I stated that technologically this might be the best time for an event such as the Brexit. Technology is more advanced and we are better connected than ever before across nations and continents. However, undoubtedly there will still be significant impact from an economic, financial and demographic point of view. As always, there will be winners and losers. As a neutral, one hopes that the people in the UK are able to achieve the goals they had envisioned in making this decision.