Exploring “Real World Fintech” at the Temenos Community Forum (“TCF”) 2017

I had the honor of attending this year’s Temenos Community Forum (“TCF”) where the theme was “Real World Fintech”.  Throughout the event, we “explored real-world examples of the latest advancements in Fintech, including blockchain, artificial intelligence, virtual reality and advanced data and analytics”.  The conference was meticulously organised and executed across three days for over 1,200 attendees.

My experience most notably consisted of attending the main conference sections in the mornings and the wealth management breakout streams (most applicable to my research were “Leveraging Technology to Navigate through Regulatory Change” and “The Future of Digital Advice in Wealth Management”) in the afternoons. I had the pleasure to meet some of Temenos’ senior management (ranging from the Heads of North America and APAC, and cloud infrastructure) through the “Senior Management Speed Dating” rotation and had the unique opportunity to attend a press/analyst lunch with Temenos’ CEO, David Arnott, as well as Ben Robinson, Chief Strategy Officer, and Mark Gunning, Global Business Solutions Director where they discussed the evolution of the Temenos solution and the components of their forward-looking strategy. One of my favourite segments of the conference was the Temenos “Innovation Jam”, where 5 finalists from across the world showcase their fintech start-up with the hope to win the final at TCF. The winner of this year’s competition was “Paykey”, the world's first payment keyboard. “PayKey uses patent-pending payment technology that works with popular messenger apps. Users just tap the "$" key to unlock payment mode directly within the app to transfer funds”. The theme across each of the finalists was: financial planning (particularly for younger investors), customer segmentation, front office efficiency (for advisors and clients), and data management and privacy. 

Of particular interest to my research (Serving NextGen Investors: Innovative Technologies and Platforms ) was the wealth management stream “The Future of Digital Advice in Wealth Management” as Temenos explained how they are shaping their platform to meet the needs of digital clients:

  • A channel agnostic environment (single-source, omni-channel, multi-user role);
  • Automated support is welcomed (Temenos’ robo-advisor, self-service in real-time on multiple devices);
  • Personalization at each stage of life (goal-based planning, younger investors, accumulating wealth for customized purpose);
  • Data as a new AuM capability;
  • The GAFA model (Digital engagement, contextual relevance to the user);
  • Digital signing and document management;
  • Chatbot / Digital assistants;
  • Digital communications (collaborations, screen, video and document-sharing);
  • Integrated market data;
  • Risk analysis and compliance.

Overall, I found the action-packed event a highly valuable learning and networking experience and I very much look forward to attending next year’s TCF. 

Celent’s Innovation and Insight Day: Wealth and Asset Management Stream

We are only weeks away from Celent's 2017 Innovation and Insight Day where we will explore how players in the financial services market are leveraging technology in innovative ways in order to differentiate themselves in an increasingly competitive and challenging marketplace. We will be featuring a number of case studies, discussions, and deep-dives into topic areas surrounding innovation and focusing on themes, such as:

  • Customer Experience
  • Products
  • Emerging Innovation
  • Operation and Risk
  • Legacy Transformation

This is the first year we will have a Wealth and Asset Management (WAM) breakout session where we will cover a range of topics around innovative solutions and trends in WAM.  The agenda can be found here: Wealth and Asset Management (WAM) Program and will be presented by analysts from the Celent Securities & Investments and Wealth & Asset Management teams:

  • David Easthope, Senior Vice President, Securities & Investments
  • Brad Bailey, Research Director, Securities & Investments
  • Kelley Byrnes, Analyst, Wealth & Asset Management
  • John Dwyer, Senior Analyst, Securities & Investments
  • Ashley Globerman, Analyst, Wealth & Asset Management
  • Arin Ray, Analyst, Securities & Investments
  • William Trout, Senior Analyst, Wealth Management
  • James Wolstenholme, Senior Analyst, Wealth & Asset Management

I particularly look forward to sharing research around the evolving wealth management landscape as the core client base shifts from baby boomers to millennials. While much ground has been covered from the perspective of wealth managers to meet the digital needs of nextgen clients, wealth managers continue to be behind the curve in their digital offerings.

How are wealth managers and vendors responding to the paradigm shift in the development and execution of services and products to meet millennials’ distinct expectations?

This is just one example of the many topics that we will discuss at I&I day – we hope to see you there!

 

Wealth and Asset Management Converges on Celent’s Annual Innovation and Insight Day

This will be the first year that Wealth and Asset Management (WAM) will have its own stream at Celent’s annual Innovation and Insight (I&I) Day. Traditionally, I&I Day has been focused on insurance and banking, and is an opportunity for insurers and banks to demonstrate innovative projects with the chance to be recognized for outstanding capabilities. Typically, each insurer or bank begins preparing months in advance by submitting their case for how they have exceled in a particular sector. For example, in banking, awards are given for innovation in payments, lending, open banking, and product innovation.

As this is the Wealth and Asset Management debut, the organization of the day will be slightly different but no less exciting. WAM attendees will have the chance to hear topical discussions and engage in healthy debate around ideas that are driving innovation in the wealth and asset management sectors. Attendees of the WAM stream will also be able to interact with insurers and banking at designated times throughout the day, creating a truly collaborative and dynamic environment.

A preview of the WAM day:

Senior Vice President David Easthope will discuss Top Wealth and Asset Management IT and Business Trends. Ashley Globerman will share how wealth management firms have modernized legacy platforms to keep up with robo advisors and to serve the millennial generation.  Will Trout will explore the degree to which artificial intelligence (AI) represents a logical next step in the development of automated advice, helping to scale asset management functions and the thinking and reach of the human advisor. I will be joined by Arin Ray to discuss how wealth managers are using natural language processing and natural language generation technology to enhance their value and improve customer satisfaction. Arin will also share how AI tools are improving efficiencies in operational risk and compliance functions, such as KYC and AML. 

Jay Wolstenholme and Will Trout will explore the intersection of Wealth Management and Asset Management. They will cover a lot of ground, sharing anecdotes of how wealth managers are adopting trading platforms and advanced technology once common to only asset managers.  Later, Jay will explore the opportunities of $100 trillion in global assets. How can asset managers and asset owners prosper in this environment using automation and analytics? Brad Bailey will follow Jay’s discussion with an equally compelling conversation on how asset management trading desks are loading up with analytics and technology to execute across an increasingly complex cross-asset market structure. The WAM Stream will end with a lively interactive panel discussion of the edge disruptors in WAM(AI, robotics, big data, analytics … you name it!).

 

Wells Fargo rides herd on DoL

It’s no coincidence that Merrill Lynch launched its new robo platform the same week it decided to exclude commission based product from IRAs. Likewise, the decision by Wells Fargo to announce a robo partnership with SigFig suggests that despite the pronouncements of pundits and industry lobbyists, DOL is hardly DOA.

It takes a brave man to guess how the Trump administration will balance populist tendencies with free market rhetoric. In this case, as I note in a previous post, the inauguration of the new president precedes DoL implementation by less than three months. The regulatory ship has left port, and in any event, it's not clear that President Trump will want to spend valuable political capital undoing DoL.

I’ll discuss Wells Fargo’s motivations in a later post. For now, I’ll note the degree to which a robo offer aligns well with the principles of transparency, low cost and accessibility at the heart of DoL. At the same time, I caution the reader to consider the challenges that any bank faces in rolling out a robo platform, a few of which I underscore in this column by Financial Planning’s Suleman Din.

Introducing The Cognitive Advisor

Last week I published a report on a topic that has interested me for some time: the application of artificial intelligence (AI) technology to the wealth management business. To date, neither Celent nor its industry peers have written much about this topic, despite clear benefits related to advisor learning and discovery. This lack of commentary, and the industry skepticism that underlines it, reflects successive waves of disappointment around AI, and more recently, competition for research bandwidth from other areas of digital disruption, such as robo advice.

Another inhibition relates to taking on an industry shibboleth. How to reconcile AI or machine intelligence to the hands on, high touch nature of traditional wealth management? This challenge is real but overstated, even when one reaches the $1 million asset level that has defined the high net worth investor. Indeed, the extent to which wealth management is a technology laggard (in general, but also when compared to other financial services verticals) highlights the opportunity for disruption.

In particular, AI offers a means to circumvent the dead weight of restrictions presented by antiquated trust platforms and other legacy tech, a weight which reinforces advisor dependence on spreadsheets and other negative behaviors. As is set out in the report, it is precisely the combination of new behaviors and technologies that can help surmount the finite capabilities of the human advisor.

Robo Advice Comes to Canada

Newly elected Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took heat back home earlier this year for imploring his Davos audience to recognize Canada not for its resources, but for its resourcefulness. Yet the intent of his statement was less to diminish the contribution of the energy sector to the Canadian economy than to underscore its distorting effects.

Remember, oil rich Canada passed the global financial crisis with flying colors. It took the end of the energy boom, coupled with the onset of digital revolution, to open the bank dominated financial services sector to fresh air and force a stolid wealth management industry to reckon with digital entrants.

Fees for investment management services in Canada are among the world’s highest, as are barriers to industry entry. For startups, the difficulty of taking on the Big Five banks is matched by challenges in getting funded. The small Canadian VC community is oriented more toward payments solutions and cybersecurity than investments, and no wonder: it’s tough to grow scale up fast in a country of 35 million.

Yet, as I point out in my recent report, Thawing Market, The Growth of Robo Advice in Canada, there is a lot happening north of the US border. Despite the odds, investments oriented fintech is gaining steam. It’s not a coincidence that the erstwhile Bank of Montreal, or BMO, this year became the first North American bank to launch its own robo-advisor. Particularly interesting is degree to which the lessons learned from the recent disruption extend beyond Canada’s borders to the US and other markets. I’ll talk about these lessons in my next post.

Run, hide, partner, or buy: Fintech, automation, and disruption in wealth management and capital markets

Readers of a certain age may remember Frankfurt's aspirations of surpassing London as the world’s leading banking center. While that vision has not come to pass, Frankfurt remains a powerful hub for global finance. Home to Deutsche Bank, the European Central Bank and the Deutsche Börse exchange among others, Frankfurt’s importance is reinforced by its location at the very heart of Europe.

With this in mind, Research Director Brad Bailey and I are excited to bring the next Celent Wealth and Capital Markets roundtable to Frankfurt on Tuesday, May 10th. Of particular interest will be the role played by fintech firms in disrupting an ecosystem long dominated by large financial institutions. Brad and I will share ideas and examples from recent research, while senior executives with banks and asset managers and other large institutions from Germany, Switzerland, the UK and Italy will offer their perspectives on the disruption and the technology strategies they have adopted in response.

To maximize the participatory nature of this event, Celent is capping attendance at 20 individuals. At present, we have a few seats still open and would love to hear from other clients interested in joining us.

From the Celent Innovation Forum, Tokyo

At Celent we have been focusing on financial services technology since our inception. Now of course all eyes are focused on fintech, which we might inversely call the use of technology to disrupt (traditional) financial services. Investment in fintech startups is significant, and the financial markets involved are huge – US$218 trillion annually in the capital markets alone. Celent recently held our latest fintech event in Tokyo to a full house, an indication of the intense interest in fintech in the Japanese market. The day consisted of two Celent presentations on fintech in the retail and institutional securities industries, followed by a discussion panel. Celent senior analyst John Dwyer presented on blockchain technology and its potential use across capital markets. Smart contracts powered by this technology could conceivably replace existing means of executing market transactions, and by enabling direct ownership might displace custodians and other intermediaries. As if this weren’t food for thought enough, governments including the US and UK are taking a serious look at putting the dollar and the pound on blockchains. Talk about fundamental disruption! Senior analyst Will Trout provided an analysis of how automated advice (robo advisory) is reshaping the wealth management industry. After the financial crisis many individuals quite naturally want to manage their assets themselves, but also require investment advice. Robo advisory, which perfectly suits the self-service, mobile lifestyle, is an answer to this dilemma. SoftBank, Nomura Asset Management and The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ joined the panel discussion, bringing their respective views on cognitive computing; the potential of fintech to lure Japan’s famously reticent retail segment to participate in the markets; and how to mobilize a large organization for innovation. A fundamental question about fintech is who will ultimately derive value from these innovations: fintech startups; technology giants like Alibaba and Google; or the incumbent financial institutions? Due partly to the regulatory stance, in Japan more than in most markets financial institutions may be in the best position to end up in the winner’s box. Only time will tell, for Japan and for markets across the globe, but you can rely on Celent to continue to provide our clients with insights in the rapidly developing world of fintech.

MiFID II on the minds of fixed income leaders

I am getting excited about participating and speaking at the Fixed Income Leaders Summit in Barcelona, Spain this week.  The timing could not be better; the fixed income world is grappling  with the challenges of an evolving market structure, innovation and technology, all within the context of a recently delivered regulatory MiFID II/MiFIR proposal. I am looking forward to hashing out the most pressing challenges facing the market, with the best and brightest leaders from all corners of the fixed income world. In advance of the conference, the European Fixed Income Industry Benchmarking Survey 2015, surveyed 50 senior buy side leaders to get a sense of their focus. The primary challenges  identified, include: the evolving center of gravity in the relationship between the buy side and sell side; digesting and understanding the regulatory framework and MiFID II guidelines: and, engaging with the changing landscape of sourcing data and electronic trading. Celent is very focused on the evolution of the fixed income business within the context of evolving market models, data aggregation/analysis and regulation.  We continue to discuss these topics in our ongoing research. I am especially eager to participate in discussions  around requirements for quoting and new reporting requirements that will impact the buy side. I will also be discussing the evolution of trading tools and electronic trading-looking at the landscape of trading platforms, new analytical tools for accessing liquidity access, and creating a holistic approach with engaging with the market across products. I look forward to catching up on all these topics. Please come by and see my session on market structure and electronic trading tools at 11:45 on Thursday in lovely Barcelona.

MiFID II and you – here before you know it

A brief review indicates that ESMA has given more clarity on its view of fixed income trading in the post-MiFID II world. We are now one step closer to a new world of secondary trading in European bonds. In the context of the heated debate around liquidity in fixed income recently ESMA has moved to an approach that looks at each bond to determine the liquidity thresholds and hence the exact nature of the required pre- and post-trading transparency. ESMA will be looking at 100,000 Euro thresholds with at least two trades occurring daily in at least 80% of trading sessions. Hence, a certain proportion of European bonds will become subject to a wholly new regime of trading-scheduled for January 2017 if there are not additional delays to the start of MiFID II. Bringing a new level of transparency to the pre- and post-trading of fixed income products, in conjunction with the myriad other touch points of MiFID II, will stretch the resources of most financial market participants. While firms have been preparing for some time, there are different degrees of readiness.  For most firms,  the next year will be huge effort, to get ready for this new trading regime.